The Zul Enigma by J. M. Leitch

The Zul Enigma by J. M. Leitch
Description
Set in 2068, The Zul Enigma seamlessly weaves New Age beliefs with hard, scientific facts to expose the perpetrator behind a cataclysmic event that occurs on 21 December 2012, end of the Mayan calendar.
Underpinned by a theme of betrayal, the novel is set against a backdrop of climate change, overpopulation, world war, alien visitations, presidential plots, global deception and a new world order.
A venomous twist reveals the most horrific conspiracy one could ever imagine and Zul is behind it. But who… or what… is Zul?
Buried deep beneath layers of subterfuge lurks the shocking truth.

The clock is ticking…

Review
Much has been made of the fast approaching end of the Mayan calendar on December 21, 2012. As an amateur astronomer I place very little significance to the date other than it is the winter solstice and the longest night of the year. However, the event has provided abundant fodder for writers around the world. Some of the works aren’t worth much and will pass quickly from the shelves. Others, like The Zul Enigma, will be around for a long time.
The Zul Enigma by J. M. Leitch spins an intriguing story beginning with the receipt of an email to Carlos Maiz, Director of the United Nations Office for Outer Space Affairs purporting to be from an alien source. Carlos’ first reaction is to ignore the message but is disturbed by the obvious breakdown in security. However, the messages keep arriving and after an investigation it appears that all of the emails originate on Carlos’ own computer.
A video attached to one of the emails warns of a major catastrophic event on the 21st of December. As this multi-generational novel progresses, Carlos is put under house arrest by the President of the United States and in the end is thought to be the greatest mass murderer of all time. I found the second part of the novel to be the more interesting, but that is a personal bias.
The Zul Enigma is interesting and is one of the more intelligent attempts to deal with what many feel will be a catastrophic event at the end of this year. While there is no evidence that the ending of the Mayan calendar will result in anything more than a resetting of their time measurement, it is fun to fantasize otherwise.
This is J. M. Leitch’s first novel. As I read, there are places that are awkwardly handled. The arrival of the first email message is a case in point. This is not meant to be critical. I have started two novels, and I have the same problem when dealing with a situation that is hard to believe. Having said that, the book is remarkably polished for a first attempt.
There is enough suspense, intrigue, betrayal, murder, and general mayhem to keep a reader that loves page-turner books happy. I certainly hope that Leitch has another novel in her.
I recommend.(By Robert Busko)
From the Author
The Zul Enigma is my first novel, a futuristic thriller. It took me 7 1/2 years to complete. It started out as a simple idea but evolved over the years into something quite different – a story with a shocking twist – that I would never have dreamed of at the start of my writing journey.
Because the underlying plot is so incredible I somehow had to draw in my readers to convince them that it might… just might… be plausible. The best way of achieving this, I thought, was to cement the characters and action in reality. As a result, I had to conduct a tremendous amount of research, which I very much enjoyed, especially the part that involved reading about the latest physics theories.
There is a page on the book’s websitecalled Fact or Fiction? that describes which theories, concepts, technology, organisations and establishments mentioned in the book actually do exist. The vast majority are real.
The thing that struck me most about writing this book was how the characters ended up driving the plot. I’d occasionally read or heard about authors saying this, but I never understood it until it happened to me. When you think about it, it’s obvious. If you’re pretending to be one of your characters you have to speak, think and act like them, meaning that they’ll do things their way, not yours. And this is how they take over… pushing your book in directions you would never have imagined.
I love this aspect of the writing process, opening my mind to the characters I create and trusting them to move the action forward in an unpredictable and exciting way.
Should you decide to download or buy a copy of The Zul Enigma, I truly hope you’ll enjoy it. After all, I wrote it for you.
About the Author
The author states: “When Mum picked me up after my first day of primary school I was in tears. ‘Whatever’s the matter?’ she asked. I spat out words between heaving staccato sobs. They were an accusing finger. ‘YOU said I’d learn to read!’
“It took much longer than I expected… but I did learn to read and I’ve not stopped since. I also learned to write and I published my first novel in 2011, The Zul Enigma.
“As to my background? Well, I was born just outside London, England, and moved to Asia where I’ve lived half my life. I now spend my time between Singapore, Assam in North East India, Bali in Indonesia and the UK.
“In addition to reading and writing I enjoy hanging out with my family and friends. I love laughing and try to spend as much time doing that as I can. I think it keeps me healthy! My hobbies are reading, tennis and travelling. I also enjoy good food and wine. Mmm… “
For further insights read an interview with the author.
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One Response to “The Zul Enigma by J. M. Leitch”

  1. pawan kumar Says:

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