This Week on Books Direct – 13 October 2013

This Week on Books Direct –
13 October 2013
Here’s a list of the articles you may have missed this week:
“Bible Studies for Kids” – Brought to you by Bundle of the Week.
This week’s bundle includes a ton of Bible study resources for kids! Discover resources for Scripture memorization, Bible study and character development, as well as handwriting practice, letter recognition and more, at more than 80% off.
“Rejection! Rejection! Rejection!” – Guest Post by AJ Meyers for Paige Nolley – Writer.
Author AJ Myers shares her publishing and rejection woes.  Keep reading to learn how she survived the piles of rejection letters.
“Here’s How Hugh Howey (Bestselling Author of Wool) Writes” – Article by Kelton Reid for Copy Blogger.
The bestselling author of Wool, Hugh Howey, has become the patron saint of empowering authors to take their publishing straight to the people. His own successes with self-publishing have recently placed him squarely in the spotlight as both a fierce advocate and savvy internet entrepreneur.
“Is Your Favorite Author a Jerk?” – Article by Amanda Nelson for Book Riot.
Does who an author is as a person influence your reading choices? Is there some ethical line an author can cross that will make you wary of reading his or her work?
“Top Tips to Train Your Brain to Come up With Creative Content” – Article by Jenny Stowemarket for VigLink.
Jenny shares her top tips for overcoming writer’s block and continued creative content creation.
“Xist Publishing Creates Digital-First Children’sBooks” – Article by Wendy Werris for Publishers Weekly.
Motivated by her young daughter’s desire to see picture books on her Kindle, Calee M. Lee, founder of Xist Publishing, taught herself how to create digital children’s books that are available in all formats, including reflowable ePub for libraries.
“Some Thoughts About Filters” – Article by Rayne E. Golay.
There is the rule not to use filters, those words that are so easy to drop into your writing. Filters don’t make writing better. In fact, if filters can be the cause of a rejection, they usually are. They also keep the reader at arm’s length from the story.
“Alice Munro Wins Nobel Prize in Literature” – Article by Julie Bosman for The New York Times.
Alice Munro, the renowned Canadian short-story writer whose visceral work explores the tangled relationships between men and women, small-town existence and the fallibility of memory, won the 2013 Nobel Prize in Literature on Thursday.
“Flowchart: Which YA Novel Is Right forYou?” – Article by Kat Ward for Vulture.
Here’s a handy flowchart to help you pick your next YA read.
“Best Fictional Redheads” – Article by Alison Cherry for HuffPost Books.
In the real world, where less than four percent of the population has red hair, being born a redhead means you’ll grow up feeling incredibly unique. But the percentage seems to be significantly higher in the world of children’s literature. When Alison was asked to pick her top redheaded literary characters, it was difficult to narrow down her list.
As a full-grown adult, Jen has gotten her fair share of dubious looks and halfhearted utterances regarding her young-adult reading habits. Well, I’m in my 40s and love to read YA. Who’s with me?
“Bestseller Success Stories that Started Out as Self-Published Books” – Article by Ronald H. Balson for HuffPost Books.
You write, you re-write, you edit, you tweak and when it’s perfect, you submit. And then you get rejected. Many times, maybe by a person who didn’t even read it. Rejectees, take heart. Many now-famous writers have been rejected before they made it big.
“How to Create a YA Phenomenon, in Nine Easy Steps” – Article by Amanda Dobbins for Vulture.
Interested in writing the next next next teen franchise? Here’s a step-by-step guide.
Special feature on Alice Ann Munro, the recipient of the 2013 Nobel Prize in Literature. She has also been awarded the 2009 Man Booker International Prize for her lifetime body of work, is a three-time winner of Canada’s Governor General’s Award for fiction and a two-time winner of the Giller Prize.

If you enjoyed this blog post, please visit the This Week page for links to more great articles.
Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: